NANNIES ANNOUNCEMENT RAISES MORE QUESTIONS THAN IT ANSWERS

Scott Morrison continues to keep Australian families guessing about the future cost and quality of their child care, with his latest child care announcement raising more questions than it answers.

 

Instead of dripping out crumbs and thought-bubbles through the media, the Government must end the uncertainty for Australian families and be upfront about its full proposal for changes to child care.

 

Australian families are anxious to find out what the Government’s child care package means for them and who will be worse off.

 

This is a government that has cut $1 billion from child care and is pressing ahead with changes to Family Tax Benefits that will see low and middle income families $6000 a year worse off. And this is the Minister who says he wants to make it harder for families to access care – with providers saying 100,000 families could be pushed out of the system.

 

What the Government really needs to focus on is making child care more affordable for the hundreds of thousands of families that rely on the system every day, including making sure families with part-time and casual work arrangements are not worse off under any changes.

 

On today’s announcement of a nannies trial, Labor wants to see flexible childcare options to support families, however we are concerned that the Government still needs to explain how they will ensure the quality of child care and protect the working conditions of nannies themselves.

 

The Government cannot claim to be supporting families with the costs of raising children while they continue to pursue cuts that make low and middle income families $6,000 worse off – it’s simply robbing Peter to pay Paul.

 

Labor wants to see families better off overall and believes that any changes to child care must protect those on low and middle-incomes, and disadvantaged children.


It's only when the Government releases the full details of its child care changes in their entirety that Australian families, and Labor, will be in a position to assess the full impact of the changes.

 

TUESDAY, 28 APRIL 2015


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