GOVERNMENT WRONG ON WELFARE

Christian Porter has once again been caught out being loose with the truth about Australia’s social security system. 

Mr Porter has a bad habit of cherry-picking numbers to suit his political argument.

Mr Porter has used the example of a single parent family with four children aged between four and 13. According to ABS data, around 4 per cent of single parents have four or more children.

It is completely wrong to say a single parent earning a salary of about $45,000 would be better off not working. This parent would still receive family tax benefits to support their children.

Christian Porter is once again twisting numbers and misleading people to justify his cuts to vulnerable Australians.

He should stop misleading the Australian people and admit that he has no credible evidence to support the Turnbull Government’s plan to cut support for young jobseekers, pensioners and new mums.

Just last week at Senate Estimates, the Department of Social Services revealed that the number of working age Australians in the social security system has fallen eight per cent since 1996.

“Since 1996, there’s been a decrease in the percentage of the working age population, aged 16 to 64 receiving income support from 24.7% at 1996 to 16.6%.”

[Department of Social Services, Senate Estimates, 20 October 2016]

Labor believes that we need to do everything possible to ensure that Australians can find a job and keep a job.

But the Turnbull Government has no plan to create Australian jobs.

On the Turnbull Government’s watch, the Australians car industry is closing, we have near record levels of underemployment, high rates of youth unemployment and yet the Turnbull Government has done nothing.

The only plan the Turnbull Government has is to give a $50 billion tax handout to big business and the banks.

Labor will continue to hold the Turnbull Government to account for its misleading campaign to cut support to vulnerable Australians.

FRIDAY, 28 OCTOBER 2016

DOWNLOAD PDF


Volunteer

Centenary of Anzac

During the First World War between 1914 and 1918, more than 416,000 Australians enlisted voluntarily from a population of just five million.

330,000 ventured overseas. 60,000 never returned.

As part...Read more

Share

Facebook Twitter Email

People who signed up