CUTS TO PAID PARENTAL LEAVE WILL HURT BREASTFEEDING MUMS

The Turnbull Government’s unfair cuts to paid parental leave will hurt breastfeeding mums according to Early Childhood Australia. 

In its submission to the Senate Inquiry into the paid parental leave cuts, Early Childhood Australia cites research from the Institute of Social Science Research that found paid parental leave was beneficial to breastfeeding and aiding the critical early bond between parents and infants.

There is absolutely no evidence to support the Turnbull Government’s decision to cut paid parental leave to 80,000 new parents each year.

Early Childhood Australia notes that the final evaluation report on the PPL scheme indicated that the evidence “strongly suggests that the introduction of PPL provides mothers with the capacity to continue breastfeeding for longer, probably primarily because of its effect in delaying their return to work the critical early bond between parents and infants”.

Australia’s paid parental leave scheme is modest by international standards, highly targeted and affordable.

If there any doubt about how out of touch the Turnbull Government is when it comes to Australian families – paid parental leave is it.

Malcolm Turnbull wants to cut support to working mothers when they have a baby and at the same time he wants to give big business and the banks a $50 billion handout.

Malcolm Turnbull just doesn’t get fairness.

Labor does not believe that new mums should be forced to choose between returning to work early and missing out on time with their newborn, or staying at home and having their living standards cut. 

Labor will continue to protect young families by opposing the Turnbull Government’s unfair cuts to paid parental leave.

TUESDAY, 24 JANUARY 2017

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